IU's Opioid Grand Challenge Moves to Phase Two

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IU President Michael McRobbie announced the effort in October 2017. (photo courtesy Indiana University) IU President Michael McRobbie announced the effort in October 2017. (photo courtesy Indiana University)
BLOOMINGTON -

Indiana University has announced 15 new projects for phase two of its Responding to the Addictions Crisis Grand Challenge. The school announced the funding as it marked the one-year anniversary of the $50 million effort.

The phase two projects will cover areas including telehealth recovery, the use of cannabinoids in fighting the epidemic and the public stigma of addiction. Phase one involved 16 projects, many of which, the school says, have already reported results. IU Associate Vice President For Strategic Research Initiatives Faith Kirkham Hawkins says ongoing work includes public forums telling stories of addiction to reduce stigma, surveys to inform policy recommendations and discussions with Indiana's congressional delegation.

The five-year effort is Indiana University's third Grand Challenges initiative. The school is partnering with IU Health, Eskenazi Health and others on the work.

According to Indiana University, second phase projects include:

Telehealth Recovery and Resilience Program -- Opioid Extension 9TRPP-O in Adolescent and Young Adult Trauma Survivors, Zachary Adams, IU School of Medicine.

Noninvasive Deep Neurostimulation Treatment for Addiction, Joshua Brown, IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Characterizing the Course of Long-Term Opioid Use Disorder Recovery and the Impact of Medication-Assisted Treatment on Opioid Use Disorder Recovery, Melissa Cyders, School of Science at IUPUI.

IN-PORT: Indiana Networks of Prescribers of Opioids and Related Treatments, Hank Green, IU Network Science Institute.

Accelerating Solutions to the Opioid Epidemic by Repurposing a Cannabinoid CB2 Agonist, Andrea Hohmann, Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science and IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Vitamin D and Opioid Use: From Real-World Data to Clinical Practice, Xin Li, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI.

Chemical Surveillance System for the Synthetic Drug Crisis, Nicholas Manicke, School of Science at IUPUI.

Opioid Addiction and Public Stigma: An Assessment of Rural and Urban Indiana Communities, Brea Perry, IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Sociology.

Hidden Mortality and Multilevel Influences in Indiana's Opioid Epidemic: Hot Spots and Hot Links, Bernice Pescosolido, IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Sociology.

Advanced Analytics for IU's Addictions Grand Challenge, Titus Schleyer, IU School of Medicine.

The Addictions Law and Policy Services, Surveillance and Community Resilience Project, Ross Silverman, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI.

Opioid Addictions and the Labor Market: Hiring and Training During an Epidemic, Kosali Simon, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Bloomington, and Katy Börner, IU School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering.

Developing a Better Naloxone, Alex Straiker, IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Substance Use Disorders, Ellen Vaughan, IU School of Education in Bloomington.

The Long-term Consequences of Opioid Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Bryan Yamamoto, IU School of Medicine.

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