Lakeshore PBS Back On The Air

Posted: Updated:
Repairs were further delayed by the lack of availability of a crew licensed to work on a 950-foot tower. Repairs were further delayed by the lack of availability of a crew licensed to work on a 950-foot tower.
MERRILLVILLE -

Lakeshore Public Media in northwest Indiana says repairs to its transmission line are complete and Lakeshore PBS is broadcasting once again after more than two months off the air. The station was able to install a temporary low-power transmitter after a severe storm damaged the previous transmitter beyond repair.

Lakeshore PBS is now available again to views over the air, as well as on DirecTV, Dish Network and AT&T. However, the station says over the air viewers may still be affected by a signal outage due to the smaller coverage area of the low-power transmitter.

The station received the temporary transmitter in August, however its transmission lines were damaged by vandals which caused further delays. The station also had trouble finding an available tower crew that was licensed to work on a TV tower of that height, nearly 1000 feet tall.

"We are very appreciative of the many viewers and members who’ve reached out to us during our outage, letting us know that they miss their programming and their local PBS station," said James Muhammad, chief executive officer of Lakeshore Public Media. "Their biggest concern was that we were going dark permanently."

Lakeshore PBS has invested more than $250,000 to purchase a new full-power transmitter, which it says is now in transit. The new transmitter took eight weeks to build and test, and the station hopes to install and transition to the new system by October 16. 

  • Perspectives

    • Indiana's Regrettable Struggle to Pass Hate Crime Legislation

      It shouldn’t be this hard. The Senate’s Public Policy Committee voted 9-1 in favor of SB-12 this week, a bill that would have codified (as written) hate crime bias to include protections for race, religion, color, sex, gender identity, disability, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, and age. SB-12 then made its way to the full Senate. Preceded by a lengthy deliberation by the Senate’s Republican caucus, the Senate voted 33-16 in favor of a watered-down...

    More

Subscribe

Name:
Company Name:
Email:
Confirm Email:
HTML
INside Edge
Morning Briefing
BigWigs & New Gigs
Life Sciences Indiana
Indiana Connections
INPower
Subscribe
Unsubscribe

Events



  • Most Popular Stories

    • Rolls-Royce to Make Indy Jobs Announcement

      Rolls-Royce Corp. in Indianapolis will Monday make an announcement about a new campaign and jobs. Few details were provided, however the company says the announcement will involve a new U.S. defense engine program.

    • Picture Courtesy: Ratio Architects

      Hilton Bringing New Hotel Brand to Indy

      Hilton (NYSE: HLT) has chosen Indianapolis as one of three markets where it will roll out its new Signia Hilton brand. The hospitality company says Signia Hilton will target meeting professionals and business travelers hosting and attending large events. The 800-room Signia Hilton will be the larger of the two hotel towers planned for the Pan Am Plaza site as part of a $120 million Indiana Convention Center expansion. Visit Indy Senior Vice President Chris Gahl expects...

    • (image courtesy WTHR-TV)

      Governor Holcomb Launches Next Level Broadband Program

      Governor Eric Holcomb has launched a program dedicating $100 million to bring broadband to rural areas of the state. The Next Level Broadband Program will be overseen by Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch and the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The Indiana Department of Transportation will administer grants and provide technical support.  

    • (photo courtesy of Purdue University)

      'Sully' Sullenberger to Speak at Purdue

      Ten years after becoming famous for landing a commercial airliner on the Hudson River, Captain "Sully" Sullenberger will Sunday speak at Purdue University. The Purdue alumnus' talk is part of the university's Giant Leaps Series.

    • Indiana's Regrettable Struggle to Pass Hate Crime Legislation

      It shouldn’t be this hard. The Senate’s Public Policy Committee voted 9-1 in favor of SB-12 this week, a bill that would have codified (as written) hate crime bias to include protections for race, religion, color, sex, gender identity, disability, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, and age. SB-12 then made its way to the full Senate. Preceded by a lengthy deliberation by the Senate’s Republican caucus, the Senate voted 33-16 in favor of a watered-down...