Indiana's Safest Cities Ranked

Posted: Updated:
Zionsville has consistently ranked among the safest cities in Indiana on a number of lists. Zionsville has consistently ranked among the safest cities in Indiana on a number of lists.

The National Council for Home Safety and Security has released its annual list of the Safest Cities in Indiana. The list was compiled using the most recent FBI Uniform Crime Statistics combined with the council's own population data and internal research.

Cities were ranked based on the number of reported violent crimes and property crimes per 1,000 people. Cities that failed to submit a complete crime report to the FBI and cities with populations under 10,000 were excluded from the list.

Zionsville is ranked the safest among Indiana cities with 31 violent crimes and 108 property crimes reported among the population of nearly 27,000. The town of St. John in Lake County is second, followed by Carmel, Fishers and Dyer.

You can view the full list by clicking here.

  • Perspectives

    • Indiana's Workforce is Mission: Critical

      Indiana is ranked the #10 Best Place to Do Business, #4 for Quality of Life, #1 for Regulatory Environment and #2 for Software Job Growth. Indianapolis is ranked #3 for Tech Jobs for Women. We have four of the top 25 Best Places to live in America, with my hometown of Fishers topping the list. Yet, in spite of these amazing rankings, we have some serious challenges to overcome within our economic development ecosystem, not the least of which is skilling up a workforce to meet demand.

    More

Subscribe

Name:
Company Name:
Email:
Confirm Email:
HTML
INside Edge
Morning Briefing
BigWigs & New Gigs
Life Sciences Indiana
Indiana Connections
INPower
Subscribe
Unsubscribe

Events



  • Most Popular Stories

    • 'Best Places' in Indiana Reaches Record

      The Indiana Chamber of Commerce has released the 2018 list of Best Places to Work in Indiana. A record 125 companies are being honored this year and more than 50 are first-timers or returning after a year or more off the list. Employers in over two dozen communities are represented and the chamber will unveil the rankings of the Best Places honorees during a May 3 awards dinner at the Indiana Convention Center in downtown Indianapolis.

    • Cook Details Major Realignment

      The president of Bloomington-based Cook Medical says changes to the company's organizational structure will drive more rapid technology innovation and continued growth. Cook is restructuring from 10 business units to two divisions, a move that will impact sales, marketing, research and development, and customer service teams. It will also establishing new distribution channel management and medical education teams. In an interview with Inside INdiana Business, Pete Yonkman said...

    • Indiana's Workforce is Mission: Critical

      Indiana is ranked the #10 Best Place to Do Business, #4 for Quality of Life, #1 for Regulatory Environment and #2 for Software Job Growth. Indianapolis is ranked #3 for Tech Jobs for Women. We have four of the top 25 Best Places to live in America, with my hometown of Fishers topping the list. Yet, in spite of these amazing rankings, we have some serious challenges to overcome within our economic development ecosystem, not the least of which is skilling up a workforce to meet demand.

    • Vectren Planning Nearly $1B in Natural Gas, Solar Projects

      Evansville-based Vectren Corp. (VVC) has announced plans for two major projects in southwest Indiana. The utility says the efforts, which include a $900 million natural gas-fired generation plant, will reduce its carbon emissions by 60 percent over 2005 levels. Vectren is also planning to install a 50-megawatt solar array that will include more than 150,000 solar panels covering nearly 300 acres. A specific location for the array was not announced. The plans are part of Vectren's...

    • Cummins to Design Combat Engines That Elude the Enemy

      The monstrous, larger-than-life military tanks of tomorrow could be powered by Hoosier ingenuity. A recent $47 million defense contract delivers marching orders for Columbus-based Cummins Inc.: develop the next-generation engine to power U.S. combat vehicles, and it must be stronger, but smaller, and elusive to enemies’ efforts to spot it.