Leclanché Opens NA HQ, Eyes Software Integration

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Leclanché NA is housed at the Purdue Polytechnic Institute in Anderson Leclanché NA is housed at the Purdue Polytechnic Institute in Anderson

Switzerland-based energy storage technology company Leclanché has just opened its new North American headquarters in Anderson, and it already has advancements on the immediate horizon. Leclanché NA Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Thom Reddington leveraged his institutional knowledge of the region’s battery- and auto-related roots to land the HQ in the new Purdue Polytechnic Institute facility there.

Leclanché makes products ranging from vehicle charging stations to grid storage system technologies. Reddington says his previous work with Delphi and other companies around the world convinced him the Anderson area was already home to the kind of people he needed to launch the 109-year old Swiss company’s North American base of operations.

“I knew there were intrinsic skill sets and knowledge already in place here,” Reddington explains.

Leclanché set plans for a North American headquarters in motion two years ago, but Reddington saw the seeds for growth in energy technology and manufacturing long before, as far back as now-Vice President Mike Pence’s congressional tenure and Mitch Daniels’ two terms as Indiana governor.

Now Leclanché NA operates out of a 10-thousand square foot facility at Purdue Polytechnic Institute’s Flagship East, once the General Motors Delco Remy Plant 3 site. It includes a developmental laboratory and manufacturing space and houses the company’s North American engineering and operations divisions.

Reddington says the company took on new life and a new vision within the past 10 years, growing well beyond its storied history of creating the dry cell battery.

“What I call the ‘new Leclanché’ is involved with everything from energy storage at a utility level, so a megawatt level, to energy storage from a commercial and industrial product, which would be more residential or small industrial-type applications for battery storage. Also, batteries for electric vehicles, electric trains – that’s our e-mobility line.”

The company’s global storage projects include an electric vehicle fast-charging station network along the Trans-Canada Highway and battery storage technology for what it says is the world’s fastest air support ferry currently in production in Europe. Leclanché grid storage systems are already in use near Chicago and Toronto.

Reddington’s small but high-performing team is set for growth sooner rather than later. He says the North American division will be vertically integrating in the near future to include the software controls of their storage sites, including site management and reporting. He’s also working to keep local partnerships in play.

“We’ll soon close a contract with another Indiana company and will integrate their knowledge of the software and controls into our company. That will be a step forward for us.”

Reddington adds that “very positive discussions” are underway with a large worldwide warehouse operation for battery-powered robotics that he believes will impact the North American division.

“Additionally, we’re simply overwhelmed with the opportunities for large utility-sized battery energy storage projects. It’s a great position to be in.”

Leclanché NA Senior Vice President and COO Thom Reddington explains that the company not only manufactures batteries but manages projects start to finish.
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