Two Historical Markers to be Dedicated

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Another historical marker honors T.C. Steele's work in Indianapolis and relationship with the John Herron Art Institute. Another historical marker honors T.C. Steele's work in Indianapolis and relationship with the John Herron Art Institute.
NASHVILLE and INDIANAPOLIS -

The Indiana Historical Bureau will Saturday hold dedication ceremonies for two new historical markers. The events will commemorate the Little Sisters of the Poor in Indianapolis and the home, studio and gardens of artist T.C. Steele in Nashville.

The first dedication will take place at 10:00 a.m. at the site of the Little Sisters of the Poor's former home at 520 East Vermont Street in downtown Indianapolis. The organization is a Catholic religious order dedicated to caring for the elderly poor and began work in Indianapolis in 1873. Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett will also proclaim May 20, 2017 "Little Sisters of the Poor Day" in the city.

The state historical marker will include the following text:

The Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catholic religious order devoted to caring for the elderly poor, arrived in the U.S. in 1868 and quickly expanded nationally. At a time when the elderly were often ignored and unseen, the Little Sisters of the Poor provided a home. They came to Indianapolis in 1873 and established a home for the aged poor on this site soon after. The home was open to anyone over age sixty with no means of support, regardless of race, religion, or ethnicity. The Little Sisters solicited alms daily to provide shelter, comfort, and basic nursing care for residents. Their dedication garnered widespread appreciation. In 1967, the home moved to 2345 West 86th Street as St. Augustine Home for the Aged.

The second ceremony will take place at 2:00 p.m. Saturday at the T.C. Steele State Historic Site in Nashville. The new historical marker will honor Steele's work along with his wife Selma's efforts "to establish the 'House of the Singing Winds' and hillside gardens," according to the IHB. Cathy Ferree, chief executive officer of the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites, and James Capshew, university historian at Indiana University, will speak at the ceremony.

The text of the state historical marker for Steele reads:

Theodore Clement Steele (1847-1926) lived and painted on property here, 1907-1926. He and his wife Selma (circa 1870-1945) established “House of the Singing Winds,” a red barn-like studio, and hillside gardens. As the leading member of the “Hoosier Group” of Indiana painters, Steele’s Impressionistic landscape paintings captured the natural beauty of the region. Known widely as the “Dean of Indiana Painters,” Steele was elected to prestigious National Academy of Design in New York City, 1913. Indiana University President William L. Bryan named him “Honorary Professor of Painting,” 1922; He worked in IU campus studio until his death in 1926. The Steeles are buried on this 211-acre site which Selma deeded to the state in 1945.


The Indiana state historical markers are used to commemorate "significant individuals, organizations, places, and events in Indiana history." You can lear more about the Indiana State Historical Marker Program by clicking here.

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