St. Joseph's College to Suspend Activities in Rensselaer

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RENSSELAER -

The board of trustees at Saint Joseph's College has voted to suspend activities on the Rensselaer campus at the end of the current semester. The announcement comes days after details emerged on what President Robert Pastoor called a "dire" financial situation at the more than 125-year-old institution. The college says the decision comes after months of "exploring multiple options and implementing strategies to overcome Saint Joseph's College's significant financial challenges."

Last week, SJC officials said it would need $100 million, $20 million of which by June 1st, to continue providing its current level of services. The school has approximately 200 employees and more than 900 students. In a news release, SJC says it will launch a "Teach-Out" program to help connect students with education completion opportunities with other schools.

It says programs outside the Rensselaer campus, including its Bachelor of Science in Nursing program in Lafayette and potentially others, will continue.

Pastoor says "the temporary suspension of operations allows the possibility of something greater to come out of this decision, and to keep the mission of the College alive. Given the financial challenges that remain, we are heartened for our students, faculty, staff and alumni that the more-than-125 year tradition of outstanding higher education will continue in some form for Saint Joseph's College."

On Monday, forums for faculty, staff and students will be held to detail the decision, the process and the future of the school. It says support meetings and counseling services will be made available throughout the spring semester.

SJC has set up a Frequently Asked Question section on its website to address the situation.

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