Study: More Students on Pace to Graduate on Time

Posted: Updated:
Indiana Commissioner For Higher Education Teresa Lubbers Indiana Commissioner For Higher Education Teresa Lubbers
INDIANAPOLIS -

A report from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education says more Hoosier college students with financial need are staying on track to graduate on time. The number of 21st Century Scholars completing 30 credit hours per year has increased by 23.4 percent at four-year colleges, and 24.2 percent at two-year institutions.

The report, Reforming Student Financial Aid to Increase College Completion, features the second-year results from legislation passed in 2013 which created financial incentives for students to complete degrees on time. 

Under the reforms, students must complete 30 credit hours per academic year to remain eligible for financial aid. Students receiving the Frank O'Bannon Grant, would receive lower financial aid if they fail to meet the 30 credit hour mark.

"Students who complete at least 15 credits a semester save money, are more likely to graduate, and enter the workforce sooner," said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. "Double-digit gains in the numbers of students meeting the 30-credit-hour benchmark for on-time completion demonstrate the ongoing positive results of 2013’s financial aid reform as well as the benefit of aligning state funding to Indiana’s goals for higher education attainment."

Lubbers says one of the main challenges is on the community college level where many students are balancing jobs, families and school. She says those students have an understandable perception that completing school will take longer, and they'll do better because of it.

"We're trying to change that mindset to say that even though in the short run, it might be a little harder, you will benefit from your education earlier," said Lubbers. "We also know that students who actually are taking those extra number of credits are more likely to complete, period." 

The Indiana General Assembly passed additional financial aid reforms this year, which the commission says "creates a smoother path back to financial aid eligibility for students who fail to meet the 30-credit-hour requirement for one year but work to get back on track the next."

The commission estimates a cost of at least $50,000 in tuition, fees and lost wages for each additional year students spend in college. You can read the full report below:

Lubbers says one of the main challenges of the program remains at the community college level.
  • Perspectives

    • How Telling Your Customers 'No' Can Improve Loyalty

      Business usually try to convert customers into loyalists by giving them what they want. That statement seems obvious... until it's not. Take Milktooth in Indianapolis, for example. The restaurant has become a star of the food scene by telling customers "no." This flies in the face of what most businesses consider to be standard operating procedure. But for Milktooth, saying no is simply good business.

    More

Events



  • Most Popular Stories

    • How Telling Your Customers 'No' Can Improve Loyalty

      Business usually try to convert customers into loyalists by giving them what they want. That statement seems obvious... until it's not. Take Milktooth in Indianapolis, for example. The restaurant has become a star of the food scene by telling customers "no." This flies in the face of what most businesses consider to be standard operating procedure. But for Milktooth, saying no is simply good business.

    • Historic Indy Building to Become Hotel

      A nearly 110-year-old building in downtown Indianapolis will soon have new life. Indianapolis-based real estate development firm Loftus Robinson is partnering with Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants in California to transform the former Odd Fellows building into a 130-room hotel with a signature restaurant. Financial terms of the project are not being disclosed, however the developer says the hotel is scheduled to open in early 2020 and create about 150 hotel and restaurant jobs.

    • Lessonly Announces More Growth

      Indianapolis-based Lessonly Inc. says a $2 million investment will create more than 100 jobs by 2020. The training software company says it will initially build on its current operations, but will look to expand its footprint in the city during the next five years. Last month, Lessonly announced an $8 million round of funding. The growth will more than double the current size of the Lessonly team. The new positions are expected to pay...

    • Second Vigo County School Funds Thief Convicted

      An accomplice in a theft of more than $110,000 from the Vigo County School Corp. has been convicted in federal court. Franklin Fennell, the district's former facilities director, will serve up to 20 years in prison for a scheme involving kick-backs on falsified work invoices. The office of United States Attorney Josh Minkler says Fennell and former Vigo County Sheriff's Department deputy Frank Shahadey worked with a local contractor to create and submit invoices that either included...

    • New Hotel Opens in Vincennes

      An $8.5 million hotel is now open in southwest Indiana. The 79-room Hampton Inn by Hilton Vincennes employs 21 associates. Hotel Development Services and Vincennes Hotel Developers LLC owns the property, which is managed by Indianapolis-based General Hotels Corp. General Manager Virgil Rasche says...