FISHERS, MERRILLVILLE, MUNSTER - Three Indiana banks have been judged as Best Banks to Work for in the U.S. by American Banker.

The publication compiled a list of the top 85 banks in the country having a good work environment and strong, engaging leadership.

American Banker says it looked at several metrics involving leadership philosophy, going above and beyond for employees, efforts to recruit a diverse workforce, their most effective ways to communicate and more.

Merrillville-based Centier Bank had the highest ranking of Indiana banks at No. 6. It has assets of $4.5 billion and 900 employees, according to the B2B publication.

American Banker says as part of Centier’s stepped-up recruitment efforts this year, it plans to post a series of videos on its website and LinkedIn page about employees’ experiences working there.

“Candidates will hear our associates’ stories about the Centier culture, community impact, volunteer efforts, career growth, and our benefits and how they’ve become ambassadors of change and career enhancement,” said President and Chief Executive Officer Michael Schrage.

First Internet Bank, based in Fishers, is ranked No. 60. It has 200 employees and assets of $3.7 billion.  President and CEO David Becker told American Banker says the key to recruiting talent at First Internet Bank is hiring non-bankers.

“Seasoned bankers will rely on what has worked for them at other institutions — and we’re just not like other institutions,” said Becker.

Munster-based Peoples Bank comes in at No. 65. It employs 263 people and has assets of $1.3 billion.

President and CEO: Benjamin Bochnowski says he has an “ask not tell” philosophy. “There is a wealth of knowledge with the employees of Peoples Bank, and we seek to draw on that whenever we can,” Bochnowski said. “We engage our employees to tell us what they value instead of telling them what they want.”

The No. 1 bank on the list is Oakworth Capital Bank of Birmingham, Alabama which has 87 employees and assets of $619 million.

The editors said a few themes emerged from their survey, including managers going out of their way to create a collaborative workplace and listen to feedback from others.