Aaron Carroll has been selected as Regenstrief Institute’s first-ever vice president for faculty development. He is a nationally recognized research scientist, research team leader and a New York Times writer and book author. The appointment leverages and complements Carroll’s experience and continuing position as associate dean for research mentoring at Indiana University School of Medicine. He will lead Regenstrief’s faculty development strategy and implementation efforts by closely partnering with IU School of Medicine and other partner leadership and faculty.

Located in Indianapolis, the Regenstrief Institute is an applied research institute affiliated with the Indiana University School of Medicine. Regenstrief is internationally recognized as a leader in applied health care research, built on decades-long innovation and impact in the fields of biomedical informatics, health services research, and aging research.

As he takes on this new role, Carroll also will continue as a professor and vice chair for health outcomes research faculty development in the Department of Pediatrics at IU School of Medicine and director of the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Comparative Effectiveness Research. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in chemistry from Amherst College, an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and a master’s of science in health services from the University of Washington, where he was also a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar.

The author of “The Bad Food Bible: How and Why to Eat Sinfully,” a writer for The Upshot -- data-driven reporting and analysis for the New York Times -- and for the Incidental Economist health services research blog, Carroll is a health services investigator with an interest in improving pediatric outcomes. Carroll’s research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care and areas of health policy including physician malpractice, the pharmaceutical industry/physician relationship and health care financing reform.

In addition to “The Bad Food Bible,” published last year, he has co-authored three books on medical myths. Carroll also has a popular YouTube channel called Healthcare Triage, where he talks about health research and health policy.