BLOOMINGTON - The National Science Foundation has awarded $4 million to the Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering. Researchers at the school's intelligent systems engineering program, which was established last year, will use the five-year grant to form one of three NSF's Network for Computational Nanotechnology nanoHUB "nodes."

The effort is focused on moving forward nanoscale devices to fight cancer and improve human health. The technology in IU's node will be focused on simulating interactions between the microscopic devices and human cells and tissues. IU says examples include ingestible, vital sign monitoring pills, blood sugar-monitoring equipment and devices that could monitor, destroy or "reprogram" cancer cells.

Interim Associate Dean For Intelligent Systems Engineering Geoffrey Fox is the grant's leader at IU and says "we're living in a world where people are increasingly 'instrumented' with wearable devices and implanted devices within the body. This award is a real vote of confidence in the school and an acknowledgement of the fact that our people are conducting extremely relevant, exciting work. To receive a grant of this magnitude only one year after officially launching an engineering department with programs in bioengineering and nanoengineering is a major achievement."

The NSF grant will also support six Ph.D. students. You can connect to more about the research and funding by clicking here.