INDIANAPOLIS - The chief executive officer of Indianapolis-based Viral Launch says growth projections, which include up to 250 jobs by 2022, are actually "pretty low." Co-founder Casey Gauss tells Inside INdiana Business the software, creative and consulting services provider for Amazon sellers has a broader scope than competitors. "We're focused on not just solving one particular need of Amazon sellers or e-commerce sellers. We're focused on building or providing the platform to help the entire business succeed."

Gauss says the company is poised for big growth, fast. "Viral Launch can be a multi-nine-figure company now, right, so at that point, there's a lot of opportunity and that window of opportunity will only, you know, last for so long," he says. "So, I want to make sure that we are growing as quickly as possible, doing anything in our powers to seize that opportunity."

Plans call for 30 new employees by the end of the year and doubling its current office space in the coming months. Though scaling-up to the size Gauss believes Viral Launch can be is ambitious, he says the targets are "fairly-easily attainable" by building "a killer team." Viral Launch plans to invest $2.2 million into the expansion, which Gauss says will help further development of its platform, creating new customer acquisition models, ramping up advertising and marketing and building a sales team. "Right now, we're basically in defensive mode managing all the traffic that is coming in. (Going forward) we'll be a lot more aggressive about driving traffic."

Gauss says it has been a challenge to secure capital in the Midwest, so the funding the company is working toward will come from "the coast." He says Indiana has been a supportive place to grow and has provided the talent and incentives -- including some $2.7 million in conditional tax and training incentives from the Indiana Economic Development Corp. -- needed so far. "A lot of people are always saying 'hey, you know, if you're running a tech company, you're going to have to be in San Francisco' or 'you're going to have to be on one of the coasts, Indianapolis isn't the place to do it.' So, honestly, part of the reason I wanted to do it here in Indy is to show people that it can be done." Gauss said.