C-SPAN to Showcase Indiana History and Writers

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C-SPAN 2 & 3 will showcase Indiana history and writers in December C-SPAN 2 & 3 will showcase Indiana history and writers in December
INDIANAPOLIS -

The cable channel C-SPAN will be showcasing the history and literary talents of Indianapolis in December, but to do so first requires a visit from show producers.

The Indiana Historical Society and Spectrum cable officials will Tuesday welcome C-SPAN to the Indiana History Center.

“With the city's bicentennial approaching, it seems appropriate to have CSPAN visit Indianapolis to highlight the contributions made by its literary and historic community,” said Ray Boomhower, author and senior editor for Indiana Historical Society Press.

TV production crews this week will be visiting historic and literary sites around the city where they will gather interviews with local historians and non-fiction writers. 

The C-SPAN Cities Tour is Exploring the American Story by traveling the U.S. to feature the literary life and history of American cities.

The material will air on the cable network’s non-fiction book channel C-SPAN 2 and its history channel C-SPAN 3 on December 21 and 22.

C-SPAN was launched in 1979 by Lafayette-born Brian Lamb. He attended Jefferson High School and then went on to Purdue University. In 2012, Lamb stepped down as CEO of C-SPAN.

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