How Health Intelligence Goes Beyond Health Analytics

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“Big data” has become a staple in today’s corporate world. In recent years, “the more data the better” has become a popular ethos. The question is, what if data isn’t enough? The last decade has proven that the challenge, as well as the opportunity, lies in turning data into action. Knowing what to do with information already gathered is the new currency in business. The rise in advanced learning techniques and artificial intelligence is proving that data warehouses and dashboards were just the beginning. Employee health is no exception.

So, what’s been the biggest shift? Moving from analytics to intelligence. Employers are switching their healthcare programs from simply large-scale data warehouses and program-based to Health Intelligence. A Health Intelligence platform’s goal goes far beyond cost-shifting measures. At its core, Health Intelligence is actionable and aims to prevent disease with data. By leveraging smart data, those that need to be in a position to read the results – not just database wizards – are able to uncover key insights and most importantly, take action.

Unlike traditional analytics tools, a Health Intelligence platform provides actionable opportunities that save both the time and the headache of searching for the problem, allowing employers to move from data explorer to problem solver. This might sound like it’s a fancy solution meant for Silicon Valley, but in fact, this game-changing solution is rooted right here in Indianapolis.

Indiana’s employer community continues to be a leading voice in the field of employee health. Our community of employers is progressive in adopting self-funding. Relative to other geographic areas, there’s also a strong adoption of near and on-site clinics for Indiana employers to provide care for their population.

By empowering businesses to take control of making employees healthier while managing healthcare costs, Health Intelligence is creating a healthier and more engaged workforce across Indiana with lasting impact.  By forecasting conditions within employee populations, employers can focus their efforts to maximize the result. Imagine a day when certain diseases can be prevented, risks are mitigated, benefits and healthcare offerings are revamped, and population health starts to improve. That day is now.

In today’s workplace, attracting that talent is more than just offering a standard salary or flashy benefits. Instead, employers need a contending compensation offering as well as competitive health plans in order to secure the best employees possible. In order to mitigate this, Health Intelligence is helping employers connect to systems that make benefits easier to access and target the health programs necessary for attracting and retaining today's top talent.

Employees’ well-being starts with their employers – and their employers start with Health Intelligence. By providing actionable insights into implementing a healthy, more sustainable workforce, employers will see a difference in their organization’s productivity and engagement, ensuring their team is their best version of themselves.

Rod Reasen is the co-founder and chief executive officer of Springbuk.

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