Helping Curb The Opioid Epidemic

Posted: Updated:

It's no secret that prescription drug abuse has turned into an epidemic throughout the U.S. Everyday, more than 115 people die from overdosing on opioids, according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates the total economic burden of prescription misuse in the U.S. to be at $78.5 billion a year, which includes health care costs, treatment and criminal justice involvement.

CareSource, a nonprofit health plan, is among those working to curb these numbers, especially in the Midwest. The Midwest has been affected most by the epidemic, with overdoses surging by 70 percent, according to the CDC.

Knowing the best steps to take in dealing with substance use disorders is important. Steve Smitherman, President of CareSource in Indiana, offers the following tips for supporting someone with a substance use disorder.

1. Educate yourself on substance use disorders.

Taking time to educate yourself on the facts surrounding substance use disorder can be an effective way to help someone through the recovery process. Education is key - find the best resources available and where to access treatment. One helpful resource is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website, which contains information about substance abuse, treatment types, treatment locators and more.

2. Seek medication assisted treatment.

Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the top treatment option for opioid abuse disorder (OUD) and is considered the gold standard in addiction care. MAT combines behavioral therapy and counseling with medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that provide a holistic or whole-patient approach to dependency. The treatment, regulated by a doctor, allows those with OUD to reduce their cravings and dependency quickly to begin their recovery.

3. Recognize that detoxification is not treatment.

Detoxification is a set of interventions that aim at clearing toxins from the body and managing the physical harm of withdrawing from opioids or other substances.  Detoxification by itself is not treatment.  It is a means to get to treatment and should only be considered if plans for ongoing treatment are established. In fact, due to the high tolerance levels of opioids and rapid withdrawal, detoxification without follow-up treatment can increase the risk an overdose.

4. Try turning to technology.

There are many great mobile apps available to support the recovery process, like the Narcotics Anonymous (NA) Meeting Search app. This app shows you the closest NA meetings and support groups by area code as well as in your vicinity using your device’s GPS location. Any app used during recovery should be used in conjunction with treatment.

5. Get a Narcan kit.

When an opioid overdose occurs, breathing stops. That’s where the drug naloxone, or Narcan, can help. Narcan is the FDA-approved medication used to block the effects of opioids, especially in the case of an overdose.

A recent, statewide study of emergency naloxone doses in Massachusetts found that when given Narcan, 93 percent of people survived their overdose. Narcan kits are easy to use and easy to obtain from any pharmacist. CareSource was one of the first insurance companies to cover Narcan kits for members.

6. Realize that recovery is possible.

Treatment works. While it is a long-term process, recovery from substance use disorders is possible. Substance use disorders are like all chronic conditions and often require repeated episodes of treatment and ongoing maintenance. With evidence-based, medication assisted treatment, behavioral health interventions and recovery support, those who suffer from addiction can improve their health and wellbeing.

  • Perspectives

    • Regional Investment Proposal Could be a Game Changer for Quality of Place Initiatives in Indiana

      While quality of place may be defined differently by people, a growing number of Hoosiers recognize the importance of this issue. In particular, the impact of quality of place on talent attraction and retention in a geographic area cannot be ignored. The future of every community is dependent on quality of place. Like many Midwestern states, Indiana is not growing at the same pace as areas in the southern and western regions of the United States.

    More

Subscribe

Name:
Company Name:
Email:
Confirm Email:
HTML
INside Edge
Morning Briefing
BigWigs & New Gigs
Life Sciences Indiana
Indiana Connections
INPower
Subscribe
Unsubscribe

Events



  • Most Popular Stories

    • GPC is a subsidiary of Kent Corp.

      Ag Manufacturer Begins Expansion

      Iowa-based Grain Processing Corp. has broken ground on an expansion project in Daviess County, which has been more than four years in the making. The company is investing $70 million to expand its Washington plant, which could create up to 20 jobs when complete.

    • Chromcraft Revington Acquisition Complete

      A Colorado company has completed its previously-announced acquisition of West Lafayette-based Chromcraft Revington Inc. As a result of the $3.5 million deal, Chromcraft will operate as a wholly-owned subsidiary of...
    • Purdue Touts New Autism Research Center

      Purdue University says it will expand community programs, resources, collaborations and faculty members researching autism with the development of its new Purdue Autism Research Center. The center has 20 faculty members from the colleges of Health and Human Sciences, Education, Science and Veterinary Medicine.

    • IU Kelley Tops U.S News and World Report Rankings

      Indiana University's Kelley School of Business is ranked first among online MBA programs and online master's programs in the most recent U.S. News and World Report Best Online Education Program rankings. Ball State University's Miller College of Business also reached the top 20 in the online MBA rankings.

    • Skilled Nursing Facility Proposed for Merrillville

      A new $7 million skilled nursing facility is being proposed in Merrillville. Our partners at The Times of Northwest Indiana report the development would include five residential buildings outfitted with 12 beds, a dining area, beauty salon and spa.