Electronics Recycling Company Grows in Plainfield

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(photo courtesy ERI) (photo courtesy ERI)
PLAINFIELD -

California-based Electronic Recyclers International Inc. has relocated its Plainfield operations into a new, 315,000-square-foot facility. Financial terms of the move are not being disclosed, however ERI says the new location will accommodate increased demand for the company's cybersecurity-focused hardware destruction and recycling services.

ERI currently employs 200 in Plainfield and a spokesperson for the company tells Inside INdiana Business the new facility significantly increases its overall capacity. The company is looking to increase its volume, which could ultimately result in the addition of hundreds of jobs to run a second and third shift. 

"Additionally, ERI has submitted a proposal for Recycling Market Development Program’s (RMDP) grant funding to add mobile technology (mobile shredder trailer) to the Plainfield facility that will add seven jobs immediately plus an awareness campaign to increase e-recycling in Indiana that could also result in the need to increase staff at the facility," the spokesman said in an email.

ERI says the new facility adds about 95,000 square feet of space, compared to its previous location in Plainfield.

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