$30M Development Moving Forward in La Porte

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(Rendering courtesy of Flaherty & Collins) (Rendering courtesy of Flaherty & Collins)
LA PORTE -

A developer is now on board for a $30 million residential property in La Porte. Indianapolis-based Flaherty & Collins Properties says plans for the 200-unit NewPorte Landing involve two buildings on the shores of Clear Lake. Construction is set to begin in the summer of next year and take about a year to complete. The project, developers say, will include a pool, outdoor courtyard, dog park and fitness center.

Wednesday, the city's redevelopment commission approved Tax Increment Financing to support construction. Commission President Don Berchem says "the timetable for this project fits very well with the work the Redevelopment Commission has been doing in NewPorte Landing. With the opening of the Dunes Event Center, Dunkin Donuts and Starbucks we have really gained some ground and are excited to see the continued growth of NewPorte Landing."

Flaherty & Collins says it has nearly $2 billion in projects under development throughout the country, including work in Elkhart, Mishawaka, Kokomo and Indianapolis.

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