Roche: New Test Elevates HIV Diagnostics

Posted: Updated:
Roche says the Elecsys can detect HIV two weeks earlier, because it analyzes antibodies and antigens in the blood. Roche says the Elecsys can detect HIV two weeks earlier, because it analyzes antibodies and antigens in the blood.

Indianapolis was the nerve center for clinical trials that have now led to Roche Diagnostics launching its newest HIV test in the U.S. Roche says the Elecsys HIV combi PT assay is a significant step forward in infectious disease diagnostics; it can detect the virus about two weeks earlier than previous generations and diagnose multiple infectious diseases using a single sample—rather than running multiple tests on different pieces of equipment.

Efficiency is critical when one considers Roche equipment and its assays are responsible for analyzing millions of samples annually inside large reference laboratories. An important feature of the Elecsys assay, or test, is that it’s automated.

“That means less hands-on time required by the medical technologist. It’s our job to streamline their workflow as much as possible by providing efficient testing means,” says Roche Diagnostics Marketing Manager of Infectious Disease Jamie Flanagan. “We’re trying to provide a consolidated approach to the lab; [the Elecsys] has only one touch point on the patient sample. In that patient’s one tube [of blood], it can run all of their infectious disease testing and not have to go back to touch the tube again.”

Unlike earlier generations, the Elecsys can simultaneously test for hepatitis C and syphilis, which are common co-infections. Roche says this reduces the need to obtain multiple samples and use additional analyzers.

“Because HIV, hepatitis c and syphilis are often co-infections in the same patient, it’s important to utilize that one tube to get patient results,” says Flanagan. “It’s a factor in patient satisfaction and patient management from the clinician’s perspective—to have all of the answers from those three assays in one setting and one report.”

The Elecsys, which is a fourth-generation test, can also detect HIV two weeks earlier, because it analyzes antibodies and antigens in the blood; the third-generation assay focuses on only antibodies. The company says another unique factor of the Elecsys is its versatility; the assay can be run in large reference labs or hospital and clinic settings in smaller communities using Roche equipment.

A similar diagnostic tool is helping manage the HIV outbreak in Scott County, caused by the injection drug use of prescription opioids. In the field, the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) uses a rapid oral swab for initial detection of the disease, then sends blood samples to the ISDH lab to confirm the diagnosis.

While the state uses a fourth-generation antigen-antibody assay in its lab to detect HIV, the Elecsys—just launched in June of 2017—hasn’t been involved in managing the Scott County outbreak, which surfaced in early 2015. IUPUI Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Public Health Practice Dr. Joan Duwve applauds any advances that could expand the public health leaders’ toolbox.

“I recognize the value of scientific achievement, and I’m always excited when science shows us a better way to do things,” says Duwve. “In situations with emerging pathogens, like Ebola or Zika, public health labs actually are first to have access to the latest and greatest diagnostic tests, before they’re even available to commercial labs. Public health labs also work closely with partners at the Centers for Disease Control, other state public health labs or private labs to expand their capacity. With limited public health resources, you have to make sure you’re getting the biggest bang for your buck.”

Roche says its fourth-generation test has been available in other countries for many years and will bring a new level of sensitivity to HIV diagnostics in the U.S.

“The sooner patients are diagnosed in conjunction with the aid of our assay,” says Flanagan, “the sooner they can be treated and receive therapies.” 

Flanagan says a fourth-generation test has been available outside of the U.S. for about 10 years.
Flanagan says Roche’s portfolio of infectious disease assays covers the entire spectrum of volume requirements.
  • Perspectives

    • Process Optimization And The Art of Mapmaking - Two Case Studies

      Large or small, businesses contain processes that define how they work. Those processes may be simple or complex, and may or may not be documented and consistent across the organization. During growth and change, processes tend to become more complex in one of two ways: Like pioneers exploring uncharted territory, start-up organizations tend to build processes organically. These methods are rarely documented and evolve quickly with technology and business changes.

    More

Subscribe

Name:
Company Name:
Email:
Confirm Email:
HTML
INside Edge
Morning Briefing
BigWigs & New Gigs
Life Sciences Indiana
Indiana Connections
INPower
Subscribe
Unsubscribe

Events



  • Most Popular Stories

    • Colts Hire Campbell as VP of Communications

      The Indianapolis Colts have hired Steve Campbell as vice president of communications. He has more than 25 years of experience working at all levels of media, community programming and public service. Campbell currently is president of Campbell Strategies LLC, a local communications and strategy firm providing media counsel to business, nonprofit and public sector clients. He founded the firm in 2009.

    • Colts Name Chief Sales & Marketing Officer

      The Indianapolis Colts have hired Roger VanDerSnick as chief sales and marketing officer. He is an Indiana native and graduate of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, VanDerSnick comes to the Colts with more than 30 years of experience in the sales and marketing field. He most recently served as chief sales and marketing officer of International Management Group College for six years.

    • Launch Indy to Celebrate Grand Opening

      The newest coworking space in downtown Indianapolis will Friday officially open its doors. Officials will celebrate the grand opening of Launch Indy, the 12,000-square-foot space located inside The Union 525. 

    • Planned Sport Resort in Jeopardy

      The fate of a planned $75 million Sport Resort in Porter County is unclear. Our partners at The Times of Northwest Indiana report two partners in the Catalyst Lifestyles LLC project have taken issues to court and little progress has been made at the 170-acre site since groundbreaking nearly a year-and-a-half ago. Plans include multi-purpose dome facilities for sports, entertainment and movie events, a cable wakeboarding lake, lodging space and outdoor athletic fields.

    • Possible Port Site Hits Transportation 'Trifecta'

      The Ports of Indiana vice president says a potential fourth port would help Indiana with a commodity that continues to be at a premium: space. Jody Peacock says the three existing state ports in Jeffersonville, Mount Vernon and Portage are using up more than 80 percent of their original footprint, "so there is a need to grow." The state announced Thursday an $8 million purchase agreement for the former Tanners Creek coal power plant in Dearborn County.