Ag Secretary Talks Farm Bill in Indy

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Perdue says the bill will serve as a "safety net" for Indiana producers and consumers. Perdue says the bill will serve as a "safety net" for Indiana producers and consumers.
INDIANAPOLIS -

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue's "Back to Our Roots" tour stopped today in Indianapolis. Perdue says the goal is to get input on the 2018 Farm Bill from farmers, producers, students, political leaders and other stakeholders. The tour, one of two he will lead this summer, also includes stops in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois.

In an interview with Inside INdiana Business reporter Mary-Rachel Redman, Perdue said the bill will serve as a safety net for Indiana producers and consumers.

"We are committed to making the resources and the research available so that Congress can make good facts-based, data-driven decisions," says Perdue in a statement. "It’s important to look at past practices to see what has worked and what has not worked, so that we create a farm bill for the future that will be embraced by American agriculture in 2018."

Perdue's stop in Indiana included an event promoting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's role in the NFL's Fuel Up to Play 60 program at Indianapolis Colts training camp as well as a tour and listening sessions at the Indiana State Fair.

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