Can You De-Risk The Hiring Process?

Posted: Updated:

Finding the best skilled talent for our growing life sciences company can be challenging, especially in a region where the skills gap continues to widen. We are devoted to spending the time and resources to identify and develop our staff. But, talent recruitment and development don't come without inherent risks.

Even after months of concentrated recruitment activity, there are times you just can’t find the right employee. Other times, you have a good candidate, but once the employee is on-staff you realize the hire is not a good match. Sometimes, things just don’t work out, despite your best efforts.

As a business owner committed to building a successful enterprise, I know that our business is only as good as the employees we hire, train, and welcome into our family of valued team members. I am proud of our talent development efforts and believe one of my top responsibilities as president and CEO is to ensure we attract the best and brightest.

We take a holistic approach to recruitment and talent development and provide multiple entry points and growth opportunities for employees in our company. We hire college interns to give them experience outside the classroom with the goal of developing an early interest in what we do: helping companies expedite life science product development regulatory pathways. Our customized training programs for both new and existing employees ensure they remain leaders in their areas of expertise.

These ongoing talent development programs take time and resources to implement and operate, but what if you could have these resources available at no cost with little-to-no risk?

That’s what we found with Employ Up, a targeted talent development program through EmployIndy. Employ Up received an $8.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to invest in training for residents who have found themselves in a job that doesn't use their skills or education, or who have been unemployed for more than six months. The grant is being used specifically to help Central Indiana businesses recruit skilled talent in the high-tech fields of life sciences and technology - two of the region’s fastest growing industry sectors where the skilled talent deficit is particularly prevalent.

We recently hired a seasoned life sciences associate who had been out of the workforce for an extended period of time raising her family. She was ready to re-enter the workforce, but wanted a new challenge. Employ Up and its Business Solutions Representative introduced her to Pearl Pathways, knowing her career interests and capabilities intersected with our needs for a quality assurance team member. Employ Up’s Business Solutions Representatives are uniquely qualified to match talent with businesses thanks to their breadth of knowledge of job demands in Central Indiana, understanding of market-specific skills gaps, and a sense of what companies need to succeed in the local market.

In addition to identifying the ideal candidate with the skills to fit our needs, Employ Up helped develop and fund a 6-month internship program. They paid for the intern to work on-site alongside our employees. That’s right. Employ Up paid for an internship to ensure the employee-employer match would succeed and that she would join our team with the precise skills needed for the job. The internship was a great trial period for both the prospective employee and our company.

So how can you de-risk a hiring decision? You use the resources that are available to you and invest in a partnership with those who have the same goal as you do to grow employee potential, the local economy, and your business.

Diana Caldwell is President and CEO of Pearl Pathways.

  • Perspectives

    • How Telling Your Customers 'No' Can Improve Loyalty

      Business usually try to convert customers into loyalists by giving them what they want. That statement seems obvious... until it's not. Take Milktooth in Indianapolis, for example. The restaurant has become a star of the food scene by telling customers "no." This flies in the face of what most businesses consider to be standard operating procedure. But for Milktooth, saying no is simply good business.

    More

Events



  • Most Popular Stories

    • ‘Invisible’ Digital Twins Taking Flight at GE Aviation

      As aircraft engines roll off the production line at GE Aviation in Lafayette, workers there are also producing “ghost” engines of sorts, called digital twins. 

    • Construction to Begin on $15M Noblesville Fieldhouse

      City and development officials will break ground Friday on a $15 million sports complex in Noblesville. Finch Creek Park Fieldhouse will include five courts with hard surfaces, two turf-surfaced fields and 11 batting and pitching cages. The project, which was first unveiled a year ago, is a public-private partnership between Klipsch-Card Athletic Facilities LLC and the city. The company is also owner/operator of the fieldhouse at Grand Park in Westfield.

    • Historic Indy Building to Become Hotel

      A nearly 110-year-old building in downtown Indianapolis will soon have new life. Indianapolis-based real estate development firm Loftus Robinson is partnering with Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants in California to transform the former Odd Fellows building into a 130-room hotel with a signature restaurant. Financial terms of the project are not being disclosed, however the developer says the hotel is scheduled to open in early 2020 and create about 150 hotel and restaurant jobs.

    • Lilly Cancer Treatment Falls Short in Study

      Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co. (NYSE: LLY) has announced it will not seek regulatory approval on another use for one of the key treatments in its cancer portfolio. In a late-stage study, CYRAMZA met its main goal of progression free-survival in patients with HER2-negative metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, but did not improve a secondary endpoint: overall survival rate.

    • How Telling Your Customers 'No' Can Improve Loyalty

      Business usually try to convert customers into loyalists by giving them what they want. That statement seems obvious... until it's not. Take Milktooth in Indianapolis, for example. The restaurant has become a star of the food scene by telling customers "no." This flies in the face of what most businesses consider to be standard operating procedure. But for Milktooth, saying no is simply good business.