Lilly Endowment Provides $10M to United Way

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The John H. Boner Community Center on the east side of Indianapolis received funding from Lilly Endowment. The John H. Boner Community Center on the east side of Indianapolis received funding from Lilly Endowment.
INDIANAPOLIS -

United Way of Central Indiana has received a $10 million boost from the Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment Inc. The funding will help support renovations to Sycamore Rehabilitation Services in Hendricks County, relocation of the Marion County Commission on Youth's offices and improvements to the John H. Boner Community Center in Indianapolis.

The work at Sycamore Rehabilitation Services involves acquiring and upgrading a facility for services to adults with disabilities. Along with the office relocation, MCCOY plans to expand youth service worker training programs. The John H. Boner Community Center intends to add space and launch an adult-focused career center.

UWCI Chief Executive Officer Ann Murtlow says "United Way's partner agencies are doing such critical work in this region to help improve the lives of our residents and create more self-sufficient individuals and families. Over the years, Lilly Endowment’s generous support for the Capital Projects Fund has magnified the agencies’ impact on those they serve."

Since 2000, Lilly Endowment has given at total of $147.5 million to United Way’s Capital Projects Fund. You can connect to more about the partnership by clicking here.

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