'Super RFRA' Bill Dies in Committee

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(Image Courtesy: State of Indiana) (Image Courtesy: State of Indiana)
INDIANAPOLIS -

A bill that would have repealed last year's Religious Freedom Restoration Act has died. Opponents say Senate Bill 66, which they dub "Super RFRA," would have opened the door for discrimination.

Opponents said the bill would also eliminate the so-called legislative fix put in place last year and allow for religious discrimination against people based on sexual orientation and gender identity. 

"We’ve been clear from the beginning that this bill does nothing to solve the problem of discrimination against LGBT people, but instead sent the message that some Indiana lawmakers are still not serious about making certain that all people have equal rights. Moving forward, we must focus on real solutions to our real problems," said Indy Chamber CEO Michael Huber. "We now know that the passage of RFRA is responsible for at least $60 Million in lost convention business which impacts not only our reputation as a convention destination, but also the hard working employees who count on our city’s visitors for their own employment. Perception is reality, and these self-inflicted wounds continue to hurt us."

Our partners at WTHR-TV in Indianapolis report committee chair Sen. Brent Steele (R-44) said the timing of the bill was "incorrect" and that it mischaracterized the overall debate over civil rights. Steele suggested the bill might fare better if it is re-introduced next year.

Two other civil rights bills, SB 100 and SB 344, are still scheduled to be heard this afternoon, beginning at 4:00.

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