IU Education Dean Announces Retirement

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Indiana University School of Education Dean Gerardo Gonzalez is planning to retire in June. He has served in the role since 2000. October 20, 2014

News Release

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Longtime dean of the Indiana University School of Education Gerardo Gonzalez will retire from his administrative role on June 30, 2015, following his 15th year leading the school. Indiana University named Gonzalez University Dean of the IU School of Education in July 2000.

During Gonzalez's time as dean, U.S. News & World Report has consistently ranked the IU School of Education among its top schools of education, most recently 25th overall and 15th among public university graduate schools. This year, U.S. News ranked the school's online program as No. 2 in the country.

Gonzalez has led the charge on numerous innovative programs, such as the Center for P-16 Research and Collaboration, which partners the IU School of Education and its resources with schools, districts and others throughout the state on initiatives such as teaching content and college access and retention. He has led the school to offer IU's first online doctorate program and collaborate on joint degrees with the IU Kelley School of Business and IU Maurer School of Law.

"Under Gerardo’s leadership, the Indiana University School of Education has consistently been one of the nation’s leading institutions in terms of producing exceptional teachers, researchers and educational innovators," IU President Michael A. McRobbie said. "Throughout his successful tenure at IU, he has been a tireless advocate for the value of schools of education at a time when there is an increasing demand for highly qualified teachers around the nation. Indeed, his belief in the importance of rigorous and well-rounded teacher training is reflected in his own substantial and diverse body of research, which spans the areas of educational administration, multicultural counseling, and alcohol and drug education, among others.

"We thank him for his dedicated service to IU and wish him well as he prepares for this next chapter of his life and career."

As outlined in McRobbie's State of the University address on Tuesday, the search for Gonzalez's replacement will take place after a comprehensive review of the School of Education. McRobbie outlined "Re-imagining education" as one of seven IU bicentennial priorities. As part of the plan, an outside panel of experts will conduct a comprehensive review of the latest trends in teacher education and education research. That review will inform the search for the new dean.

Gonzalez came to Indiana University after serving as the interim dean of the College of Education at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he was also professor and chair of the department of counselor education and the associate dean for administration and finance. He also served as director of the University of Florida Campus Alcohol and Drug Resource Center and assistant dean for student services.

When he leaves as dean, Gonzalez plans to take some time away but then return to full-time work on the School of Education faculty.

"Gerardo has been an excellent and trusted colleague during his time as dean on the Bloomington campus," said Provost and Executive Vice President Lauren Robel. "His global vision has connected our students to meaningful teaching experiences both in the U.S. and abroad, which have prepared them for the demands of the education profession in the 21st century. He has expanded the way we think of education research on this campus, and we are grateful that he will continue his research, teaching and service as a member of the faculty."

Gonzalez said the time is right for him to leave the dean position.

"It has been a privilege and an honor to represent the excellent faculty, students, alumni and staff of the School of Education as well as promote the academic traditions of Indiana University as dean during a time of immense challenges for public education," Gonzalez said.

"Given the improving economy and strong position of the school, this seems like a good time to pass on the leadership role.

"On a personal level, I look forward to devoting more attention to my teaching and research and spending more time with my family," he added. "When we moved to Bloomington, I had no idea this would turn into one of the longest deanships at IU and nationally. I've enjoyed every minute of it."

In his time as IU School of Education dean, Gonzalez has spoken passionately and effectively for education policies to best serve all learners and prepare quality teachers and educational leaders. Particularly during education reform discussions of the past several years, he has testified frequently at the Indiana General Assembly and Indiana State Board of Education and in other settings to provide leadership on key issues. Gonzalez has contributed editorials on these matters both locally and nationally, with his columns appearing in the Indianapolis Business Journal, The Indianapolis Star, Education Week and other publications.

Gonzalez is a recognized expert on alcohol and drug education and has written extensively on drug and alcohol issues and their impact on college student success. In 1975, he founded the BACCHUS Network, a collegiate peer education program that supports student academic and personal success by building skills in student leaders to address campus health and safety issues.

Informed in part by his experience as an immigrant from Cuba at age 11, Gonzalez is also active in multicultural counseling and education issues. He has addressed national and international groups and written scholarly works on the Cuban-American experience and Hispanic educational concerns. In 2012, Hispanic Business named him one of the 50 most influential Hispanics in the United States. Speaker of the Indiana House of Representatives Brian Bosma also named him to the Indiana Commission for Hispanic/Latino Affairs in 2012. Gonzalez was awarded the IU Latino Faculty and Staff Service Award in 2003 for his advocacy of educational equity and access for underrepresented groups.

IU Bloomington is the flagship residential, research-intensive campus of Indiana University. Its academic excellence is grounded in the humanities, arts and sciences, and a range of highly ranked professional programs. Founded in 1820, the campus serves more than 42,000 undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in more than 300 disciplines. Widely recognized for its global and international programs, outstanding technology and historic limestone campus, IU Bloomington serves as a global gateway for students and faculty members pursuing issues of worldwide significance.

Source: Indiana University