Indy Company Launches Chocolate Bar Line

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Indianapolis-based Endangered Species Chocolate is introducing a chocolate bar line this week in 1,500 Kroger stores. The company says the bar, which uses dairy-free ingredients, will be available nationwide in March.

January 13, 2014

News Release

Indianapolis, Ind. -- A new chocolate bar line by Endangered Species Chocolate (ESC) is hitting grocery shelves this week, and this one not only tastes as decadent as it looks, but it’s the country's first cr?me-filled chocolate bar that’s made with all natural and dairy-free ingredients.

Endangered Species Chocolate is introducing cr?me-filled bars at more than 1,500 Kroger stores across the country. The Indianapolis-based chocolate company’s newest 72 percent dark chocolate bars come in six flavors - almond butter cr?me, sea salt and lime cr?me, coconut cr?me, raspberry orange cr?me, blueberry vanilla cr?me and lavender mint cr?me.

"Health conscious consumers will be able to still enjoy the benefits of dark chocolate while experiencing a new decadent taste of cr?me filling," said Whitney Bembenick, Endangered Species Chocolate's research and development manager, who developed the flavorful cr?me-fillings. "Until now, no one has offered a cr?me-filled bar that is dairy-free with all natural, ethically traded ingredients that tastes as indulgent as it looks and sounds. It’s as close to a guilt free truffle as you can get."

The new cr?me-filled bars are being introduced at Kroger and affiliated stores that feature a natural food section beginning this week. The bars will be launched nationally in March. Like all Endangered Species Chocolate products, the cr?me-filled bars combine ethically traded, sustainably grown chocolate and are gluten-free and vegan certified.

"We wanted exotic, sophisticated flavors that would blend with the premium dark chocolate Endangered Species Chocolate has become known for," Bembenick said. "We knew we had to do something more than the traditional cherry or peppermint. Our cr?me-filling flavors are unexpected combinations. The result is a set of chocolate bars that belong in a class of their own."

As a champion for the environment, Endangered Species Chocolate also is leading the way in promoting a sustainable palm oil option to support species, habitat and humanity. The company worked tirelessly to find alternatives to conventional palm oil, something ESC does not use in any of its products. Conventional palm oil is one of the most widely used edible oil crops (found in about 50 percent of all packaged food products), but is one of the most destructive, as palm oil farming methods destroys critical habitats, threatens forest communities and contributes to climate change.

Endangered Species Chocolate discovered certified, sustainable palm oil, which is used for the dairy-free cr?me filling. This single-source, organic palm oil is supply-chain certified by Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) and EcoSocial. Its source for the sustainable palm is committed to zero deforestation and leads the Green Peace’s scorecard for social and environmental palm oil production.

"We want to demonstrate how to use sustainable palm oil in a responsible way," Bembenick said. "By implementing it in our chocolate bar filling we’re able to develop new and innovative cr?me flavors such as our sea salt and lime bar, without compromising taste or the environment. These flavors are commonly used in many types of cuisine, but pairing them with the richness of our dark chocolate and smooth non-dairy cr?me results in a bright, fresh experience for the pallet. This flavor profile would not have been achieved without the use of sustainable palm oil."

Endangered Species Chocolate's commitment to the environment goes beyond its ingredients. Every year, ESC gives 10 percent of net profits to nonprofit organizations that support species and habitat conservation. Since 2010, Endangered Species has donated more than $760,000 to nonprofit organizations working to save endangered species and habitat.

In addition, the company is a sponsor of the Indianapolis Prize, an award given by the Indianapolis Zoo to an individual who has made significant strides in conservation efforts involving an animal species or multiple animal species. It is frequently referred to as the world's leading award for animal conservation by members of the professional wildlife conservation community.

In addition to the financial contribution, the company is dedicated to educating the public. Each bar wrapper highlights an animal with information about its conservation status, a species region map, and ways to support species and habitat conservation.

Born out of a desire to make an impact and rooted in a deep love for chocolate, ESC was founded in 1993, in Talent, Ore. The company moved to Indianapolis in 2005, where it’s steadily grown into one of the leading natural product chocolate brands in the country. The company produces as many as 65,000 chocolate bars daily from its chocolate factory on the west side of Indianapolis.

The new cr?me-filled bars mark the third time in the last 12 months that ESC has introduced new chocolate products into the market. In January 2013, the company introduced two new bars – 72 percent dark chocolate with sea salt and almonds, and 72 percent dark chocolate with cherry – and then for the holidays, two new seasonal flavors – 72 percent dark chocolate with vanilla chai and 72 percent dark chocolate with pumpkin spice and almonds.

About Endangered Species Chocolate

Indianapolis-based Endangered Species Chocolate is a mission-driven company that is passionate about chocolate and the environment. Endangered Species Chocolate is committed to providing chocolate-lovers with premium, natural and organic chocolates that are ethically traded and sustainably grown. Adding to the impact of each chocolate bar, Endangered Species Chocolate donates 10 percent of net profits to fund species and habitat conservation. A top selling brand in the natural food category, Endangered Species Chocolate offers more than 30 products. For more information, visit www.chocolatebar.com.

Source: Endangered Species Chocolate