Indiana Projects Win TIGER Grants

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The U.S. Department of Transportation has announced funding for two Indiana initiatives as part of its Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery program. IndyGo in Indianapolis will receive $10 million for an electric bus project and the state department of transportation is being awarded more than $8 million for a bridge replacement effort. INDOT says the funding will help with the nearly $14 million White River Freight Railroad Bridge replacement in Greene County.

The current 110-year old steel bridge is obsolete, even though the federal department says 26,000 carloads are projected to go over it this year.

IndyGo will pump the money into a $12.5 million project to purchase 22 buses that have been converted from diesel powered to a zero-emission electric system.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation

September 5, 2013

News ReleaseINDIANAPOLIS (Sept. 5, 2013) – This morning, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announced the award of $10M in Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) funds to IndyGo, the public transit agency for Indianapolis, Indiana. The highly competitive grant program prioritizes transportation projects that have significant impact on outcomes relating to state of good repair, economic competitiveness, livability, environmental sustainability and safety of the nation’s transportation infrastructure. The award of these funds will allow IndyGo to recondition and repower upwards of 22 transit vehicles, employing a zero-emissions electric propulsion system.

“As a strong proponent of improving transit for Hoosiers, I was glad to lend my support to this effort,” said Congressman Andr? Carson. “Recycling used buses to make them fully electric will save us money, reduce waste, energy consumption and dependence on foreign oil, and maintain a quality transit system for years to come."

The 22 remanufactured electric propulsion transit buses will be completely rebuilt to like-new condition with a zero-emissions drive system and will cost approximately $555,000 each, comparable to a brand new diesel bus. In addition to the cost to rebuild and repower the vehicles, the grant also funds necessary charging stations at the IndyGo facility and the Transit Center, which is set to open in late 2015.

“Today’s announcement of the TIGER grant award supports our city’s goal to reduce dependence on foreign oil,” said Greg Ballard, Mayor of Indianapolis. “By introducing zero emission, post-oil technology public transit buses, we’re making another successful leap in the right direction.”

The new electric buses will have a range of approximately 100 miles and will provide the equivalent of 16 MPG, quadruple the energy efficiency of a conventional diesel bus. The 22 new electric vehicles will be used on routes that are compatible with the range limitations and will allow IndyGo to retire some of its older buses.

“IndyGo is thrilled to have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of the transit industry with the project,” said Michael terry, IndyGo President and CEO. “We’re always investigating innovative ways to refresh our fleet and use technology to build capacity with the limited funds that are available to operate vital transit services.”

For project updates and other news, visit IndyGo.net.

Source: IndyGo