Bridge Section Set For Demolition

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Indiana and Kentucky demolition crews are set this morning to take down the third section of the old Milton-Madison Bridge in southeast Indiana. The 400-foot span will be blasted into the Ohio River using a series of controlled explosions. The final section is set to come down later this month.

September 4, 2013

News Release

MADISON, Ind. and MILTON, Ken. - A third section of the old Milton-Madison Bridge is scheduled to be demolished on Thursday, Sept. 5. The 400-foot section will be brought down using controlled explosives. Because of the span's proximity to a residential area in Madison, residents will be asked to stay indoors starting at 8:30 a.m. until after the blast.

When:

Demolition is scheduled for shortly after 9:00 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 5

The new US 421 bridge and roads within the 1,000-foot safety perimeter will close starting at 9:00 a.m. and are expected to reopen to traffic at or before 11:00 a.m.

Where:

The designated media area is located at 98 Hwy 36 in Milton (Look for a large pink pig statue next to the gravel entrance!) Media outlets can also set up anywhere they choose outside the 1,000 foot safety zone (see attached map).

Details:

Similar to the two previous blasts, a 1,000-foot safety perimeter will be established around the blast zone.

Recreational boaters are required to stay 1,000 feet from the bridge. An FAA no-fly zone of 2,000 feet will be in effect prior to and during the blast.

News Release

Originally Posted August 30, 2013

Louisville, Ky. - Spectators and residents are urged to take extra precautions during

the explosive demolition of a section of the old US 421 Milton-Madison Bridge, currently scheduled for Thursday, September 5.

Weather permitting, the 400-foot-long northernmost section of the old truss will be removed using controlled explosives at approximately 9:00 a.m. on September 5.

Because of the span's proximity to a residential area in Madison, residents will be asked to stay in doors starting at 8:45 a.m. until after the blast on the morning of demolition.

Walsh Construction plans to distribute informational flyers to all residents living within the 1,000-foot safety perimeter.

Spectators must remain outside the safety perimeter, which will be strictly enforced by law enforcement officials.

The new bridge will close at approximately 9:00 a.m. and is expected to reopen to traffic at or before 11:00 a.m.

Other roads and intersections within the designated 1,000-foot safety perimeter will be closed at 8:45 a.m., including:

Vaughn Dr. between St. Michaels and Ferry St.

Fillmore St.

1st St. from Baltimore to Vaughn. Dr.

Clay St. from Fillmore St. to Adams Ave.

Harrison St. at 2nd St.

Ferry St. from 56 to Vaughn Dr. River traffic will be closed starting at approximately 9:00 a.m. and will reopen shortly after the blast.

Recreational boaters are required to stay 1,000 feet from the bridge during the blast. An FAA no-fly zone of 2,000 feet will be in effect prior to and during the blast.

A 1,000-foot safety perimeter will be strictly enforced.

Once the safety perimeter is secured, sirens will sound at 10-, five-and one-minute intervals prior to the blast.

Pieces of the truss will be retrieved from the river, dismantled and sold for scrap.

The main navigational channel will not be impacted by the removal of the truss.

During the bridge closure, drivers can detour 26 miles upstream to the Markland Locks and Dam Bridge.

The last section of the old 2,427-foot-long bridge will be demolished later in the month.

Once the old truss is completely removed, the original piers will be widened to accommodate the new 40-foot-wide bridge which is currently on temporary piers. The final step comes later this year, when the new bridge will be slid onto the renovated original piers.

The Milton-Madison Bridge Project - a joint effort between the Indiana Department of Transportation and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet - has received numerous awards. It was named one of the top 10 bridge projects in the country by Roads and Bridges Magazine, received a 2012 Best of What's New Award from Popular Science magazine and received several state and national engineering awards for innovation. For more information, visit www.MiltonMadisonBridge.com or follow the project on Twitter.

Source: The Milton-Madison Bridge Project