updated: 2/27/2009 11:10:14 AM

Indiana Business Schools Fare Well in National Rankings

Inside INdiana Business.com Report

Two Indiana institutions have made the top 50 of Business Week magazine's 2009 list of the top undergraduate business programs. The Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame ranks second, trailing only the McIntire School of Commerce at the University of Virginia. The Indiana University Kelley School of Business is ranked number 20.

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Source: Inside INdiana Business

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The Kelley School was number 16 last year, while the Mendoza College was third.

Beyond this year's top 50, The Krannert School of Management at Purdue University is ranked 61st.


Source: Business Week


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Press Release

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Indiana University's Kelley School of Business continues to be ranked among the nation's elite, ranking second among Big Ten schools and 20th overall in Business Week magazine's new evaluations of undergraduate business programs.

Business Week, which announced its fourth ranking of undergraduate business programs through a Webcast late Thursday (Feb. 26), also said that Kelley was ranked seventh among all such programs at public universities. Kelley's undergraduate program has always been among the magazine's top 20 throughout the history of the survey.

In the most recent ranking of MBA programs, Business Week also ranked Kelley's MBA program 15th.

Kelley maintained its "A-plus" grade for its career services operations and was ranked 14th overall by corporate recruiters.

In its comments about Kelley's undergraduate program, the magazine reported, "Students applaud core curriculum that integrates several disciplines; career placement wins raves."

"We track a wide range of internal metrics related to our core mission of research, teaching and outreach. That said, media rankings such as those produced by Business Week are relied on by parents and prospective students when narrowing the set of schools they consider," said Kelley School Dean Dan Smith. "There are over 3,000 colleges and universities that grant business degrees. The most recent Business Week ranking places us among the elite 1 percent in the nation.

"It speaks well of the commitment of our faculty, students and staff who routinely go the extra mile to provide our students with a truly world-class educational experience," Smith added. "At the same time, we are never content and will continue to create highly innovative programs and an exciting high-achievement environment for our students."

M.A. Venkataramanan, chair of the undergraduate program in the Kelley School and the Lawrence D. Glaubinger professor of business administration, noted that despite a tough economy, interest in his program is strong among top achieving students.

"We've seen substantial increases in both the average SAT and ACT scores for students entering the Kelley School in the last four years," Venkataramanan said. "We've seen a 13-point increase in average SAT scores among all students in the last year and an 80-point increase in the last four years."

"For our recent graduates, the median salary is up 12 percent over the last two years and rose 4 percent last year despite a tough economy," he said, adding that the school has a 99.7 percent graduation rate."

The school recently has announced several important initiatives, including a $60 million capital campaign to expand and renovate its undergraduate facilities, faculty hirings to maintain its low faculty-student ratio despite an increasing enrollment, and efforts to increase the diversity and inclusiveness of its student body and faculty.

Other Indiana schools were included in the rankings. The University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, a private school, was ranked second and Purdue University was ranked 61st. Business Week ranked a total of 101 schools this year.

Source: Indiana University




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