updated: 5/30/2006 10:26:30 AM

IU School of Medicine Offers New Sinus Treatment

InsideINdianaBusiness.com Report

The Indiana University School of Medicine is now offering a new treatment for chronic sinus inflammation.

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Balloon Sinuplasty uses a catheter and a balloon to open and expand blocked sinuses. The treatment is minimally invasive and offers an alternative to pharmaceuticals and conventional sinus surgery.

Source: Inside INdiana Business

Press Release

INDIANAPOLIS – Think of it as balloon angioplasty for the sinuses. This new treatment for chronic sinus inflammation being performed by an Indiana University School of Medicine physician may offer people new options for treatment.

Balloon Sinuplasty™ is a minimally invasive procedure that utilizes a small catheter and a balloon to quickly open and expand blocked sinuses, restoring normal sinus drainage and function. Until recently, patients with sinusitis were treated with pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics or topical nasal steroids, or conventional sinus surgery which, in some cases, requires bone and tissue removal to unblock sinus passageways.

The procedure is being done by James D. Ulm, M.D., assistant professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery at the IU School of Medicine.

“The balloon endoscopic procedure is a major breakthrough because it may provide a lot of people who have failed medical therapy an alternative solution other than the more traditional sinus surgery,” said Dr. Ulm. “There are 37 million people with sinus problems in the United States, accounting for more physician visits than for hypertension or diabetes.”

Not all patients will qualify for the procedure, but for those that do, the surgery is less time-consuming, is safe and effective and has a shorter recovery time and less discomfort than the more traditional sinus surgery. Most patients can return to work the next day, said Dr. Ulm.

For additional information or to schedule an appointment, call 317-278-3189 or 317-688-4864.

Source: Indiana University School of Medicine

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