• Rural Nonprofits Lack Planning Expertise

    There have been several efforts targeting the advancement of rural communities and their welfare. However, the nonprofits that play a pivotal role in providing service to these same areas are struggling to operate efficiently. A recent survey conducted puts the focus on their plight. Our firm appealed to over 100 organizations in a 20-county area focused in southeastern Indiana, bordered primarily by Interstates 65 and 70. The results were not surprising.

  • Avoiding Accidental Franchise Pitfalls

    Most people think they know a “franchise” when they see one—McDonald’s, Subway, 7-Eleven, Anytime Fitness, to name a few. However, there are some franchise relationships that are not so obvious. Many business relationships, including those in manufacturing and distribution, could easily become “accidental” franchises if companies are not careful. 

  • Innovate, Collaborate and Take Indiana to the Next Level

    When I think about what makes Indiana so great, many things come to mind: our stellar business climate, our world-class life sciences industry, our cutting-edge technology scene, and our enviable agriculture sector.  

  • The Growth of IoT in Agriculture

    One of the oldest human trades is farming. Since the dawn of civilization, a need for regular, stable food production has been a staple of society. Today, agriculture is responsible for over $130 billion of our gross GDP in America. 

  • The Supreme Court Expands Opportunity to Challenge Wetlands Determination

    Property owners should take note that the United States Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, expressed concern over the scope and uncertainty of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”).  In recent weeks, the Supreme Court made an important decision about wetlands determinations under the CWA. 

  • How Will the ‘Defend Trade Secrets’ Act Help Indiana Agribusinesses?

    Agriculture businesses rely more than ever on the secrecy of their data, financial information, special techniques, and their business opportunities to differentiate themselves in the marketplace. Can the new benefits of the Defend Trade Secrets Act help Hoosier agribusinesses gain a competitive advantage? 

  • FFA Preps Students for STEM Careers with School-based Agricultural Education

    As FFA evolved over the course of its nearly 90-year history, a critical need arose in agriculture: the importance of attracting young men and women to careers related to science, business, engineering and math (STEM). Today, the organization is prepared to be the conduit to STEM careers by supplying FFA members who will be the next plant pathologists, ranchers, veterinarians, consumers and civic leaders.

  • Growing IT and Big Data in Agriculture

    Have you ever been inside the cab of a tractor or combine?  Today more technology exists in the cab of a tractor than in most offices. 

  • Ag Careers STEAM Forward

    About the only thing hotter than STEM careers right now may be STEAM careers – Science, Technology, Engineering, Agriculture, and Math. 
  • They Are Revolutionary, But Don't Call Them Drones

    The public hates 'drones.' When most people think of them, they think of military air strikes. I challenge you instead to think of their many other uses. Most drones today are not being used as weapons of war, but for beneficial purposes in our society...
  • Ag Trade Mission to China Cultivates Business Opportunities

    In late June, I had the pleasure of leading an 18-member delegation of State and private sector agricultural leaders on a 12-day Indiana Agricultural Trade Mission to China. These trade missions are important first steps in building relationships with government and business leaders...
  • Perspectives

    • Job Insights For The Third Quarter

      To provide accurate and timely employment forecasts for business leaders, Express Employment Professionals International Headquarters conducts an ongoing Job Insights survey to track quarterly hiring trends across a wide range of industries. Express surveyed business owners, decision makers, and human resource professionals about the overall hiring trends in their markets and how they impact their hiring decisions. Overall confidence remains high going into the second half of 2018.

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  • Most Popular Stories

    • Purdue Professor, Wife Indicted For Fraud

      A Purdue University professor and his wife have been indicted on federal fraud charges. U.S. Attorney Thomas Kirsch's office says Qingyou Han and Lu Shao are accused of hatching a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation. 

    • Maureen Krauss (pictured left) is chief economic development officer at the Indy Chamber and Tom Leinbarger (pictured right) is chief executive officer at Cummins Inc.

      Indiana Businesses Fret Potential Trade War

      As a potential trade war looms over recently-imposed tariffs on China, Indiana businesses are expressing concern about the fallout. It is estimated that global trade supports more than 800,000 jobs in Indiana, many of those in the manufacturing and agriculture sectors. In 2016, Columbus-based Cummins Inc. sold more than 500,000 engines in China. Chief Executive Officer Tom Linebarger says the company's global footprint generates jobs and investment in Indiana.

    • Devour Indy Restaurants Unveiled

      Devour Indy has released the list of restaurants participating in the Summerfest 2018 event, which kicks off next month. More than 100 Indianapolis-area restaurants are participating this year, including more than 10 new additions to the list. 

    • The fund was first announced as part of Holcomb's Next Level Agenda. (Image courtesy of the state of Indiana.)

      Next Level Fund Makes First Investments

      Governor Eric Holcomb’s office says the Next Level Indiana Trust Fund has made its first two funding commitments. The fund, created by the Indiana General Assembly in 2017, has awarded a total of $21.5 million to Indianapolis-based High Alpha Capital and Colorado-based Foundry Group.

    • Walmart Details Crawfordsville Layoffs

      Walmart Inc. (NYSE: WMT) is reducing workforce at the Walmart Optical Lab in Crawfordsville. In a notice to the state, the company said 108 employees will be out of work by the end of September. A corporate spokeswoman told Inside INdiana Business the decision was a response to "changing business needs." She added "we are making adjustments at our Walmart Optical Labs in Crawfordsville to help ensure we have the right people in the right place at the right time."